Author Topic: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō  (Read 2233 times)

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Arashkai
« Reply #30 on: August 13, 2021, 05:38:09 AM »
Mainland Daitō
大東

Pictured: The Northern Akaishi mountains
   Daitō (大東; "Great Eastern Country"), also known as Akitsukuni (秋津國, "Autumn Harbor Country"), is a region in Northeastern Ardia which borders Cassiopeia to the west, Rokkenjima to the south, and the Kynean and Dauntelan seas to the North and East. Covering an estimated area of 228,297 kilometers, it is 1,876.9 kilometers from east to west and 1,414.5 kilometers from north to south. It's most populous city, Ashina, has a metropolitan population of 32,763,000 and a population within the city-proper of 19,771,365 according to the last census. The region is known for it's hilly terrain and is bound by the Idai mountains to the south and west; these mountains have served to defend the residents therein from attack on the continent for millennia, with only a few ever truly breaching it.
Pictured: Mount Idaina
   While the term "Idai Range" refers to all of the mountains that run along the west and south of Daitō, the mountain range is technically divided into two, those being the Akaishi mountains in the West and the Kunan in the south. The mountains were formed as a result of the subcontinent colliding with Ardia around 28 million years ago. The highest peak, Mount Idaina (偉大な山, Idainayama), as pictured above, stands at 7,852 meters and is one of the tallest mountains on the continent. Mount Idaina is seen by the Daitōjin as one of the holiest sites in the Teidō faith, being where Ninigi-no-Mikoto, the ancestor of Shin'ō Tennō, first descended to Mundus from the heavens with mandate to rule over man.
Pictured: Kitagishima Island, Lake Mutsu
   Despite being between 1,890.5 and 3,903.3 km south of the equator, Daitō's climate is, due to a variety of factors ranging from ocean currents and the jet stream to the nation's higher than average elevation and wetter climate, far cooler than would be expected at its latitude. On average, the coasts see higher precipitation than inland regions save for around Lake Mutsu and in the mountains. Rainfall across the region regularly sees more than 900mm each year. Generally speaking, Daitō's climate ranges on the Kφppen-Geiger climate classification system between a Dfb (Cold, no dry season, warm summer) in the south of the country to a Cfa (Temperate, no dry season, hot summer) in the north. The peaks of the Idai mountains are often classified as a Dfc (Cold, no dry season, cold summer) on this scale as well. While snowfall is common in winter in most of the country, the further north you go, the less common it becomes and the less likely it is to stick. Regardless of this, it will still snow as far north as Ashina several times each winter.
Maps
Spoiler: Regional map • show

Spoiler: Topographic map • show

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #31 on: August 19, 2021, 05:25:57 PM »
Ikijima
壱岐島


TBA

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2021, 05:27:14 PM »
Styria
スティリア


TBA

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #33 on: August 19, 2021, 05:59:05 PM »
Landmarks of Daitō

The following is a list of major landmarks within Daitō and her overseas territories, as well as a bit of information regarding these sites.
Imperial Residences

Ashina Imperial Palace

An Entrance to the Imperial Palace
The Ashina Imperial Palace, more typically referred to as just "the Imperial Palace", is the primary residence of the Emperor of Daitō and his or her family. It has been used in this role since the late 1400s with the moving of the capital from Kaiyō to the city of Ashina. Since then, it has undergone several expansions and renovations, with the last one occurring in the early 90s. The total area of the palace including its gardens is approximately 1.15 square kilometers and was, in the 1980s, valued by some as more than the value of all the real estate in Centralia combined.
Spoiler: Maps • show

Pictured: Map of the Kyūden (Main Palace, Provided by the Grand Secretariat of the Imperial Household Agency, c.2019)

Pictured: Map of the Imperial Palace Grounds

Kaiyō Imperial Palace

The Shishinden of the Kaiyō Imperial Palace
The Kaiyō Imperial Palace is the older of the two main Imperial Palaces, having existed in its current form since the 11th century. It was in this palace that the Heiwa Emperor, who unified Daitō, ruled, and where the Emperors from him until as recently as Emperor Kunan were enthroned. Today, while the Emperor's time is spent between various palaces, he does make an effort to spend some time each year at this historically significant site. Previous palaces are known to have existed in the region as well, dating as far back as the Empire itself.
Spoiler: Images • show

Overhead view of the Kaiyō Imperial Palace, c.1982

Enthronement of Emperor Kunan, c.1932

Replica of the Celestial Throne in the Shishinden
« Last Edit: August 20, 2021, 03:04:54 AM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #34 on: August 21, 2021, 11:22:17 PM »
Orders, Decorations, and Medals of Daitō


The Daitōjin Honours System originated in the 1870s, following the end of the Ardo-Daitōjin war of 1868. It was modeled off of occidental honour systems, though certain native honours still exist in one form or another. The following are these orders, decorations, and medals.
Current Orders
Spoiler: show
   • Supreme Order of the Chrysanthemum — Established in 1877 as the premier collar of the Empire of Daitō; originally in one class (Grand Cordon) before being expanded to two classes (Collar; Grand Cordon) in 1886
      • Collar — The highest possible honour that may be conferred. The Collar is only ever worn by the reigning Emperor and is normally only awarded to foreign monarchs as a courtesy. Before 1958, the Collar was also conferred upon extremely influential Cabinet members, senior members of the Imperial Family, and certain senior military officers who held the rank of Marshal. It can be awarded posthumously to extremely distinguished Prime Ministers of Daitō.
      • Grand Cordon — Typically conferred upon royals of the Imperial House of Daitō, foreign royalty who are not reigning monarchs, certain foreign non-royal Heads of State, and select Daitōjin Prime Ministers. Until 1958, the Grand Cordon was often conferred upon eminent military officers of the rank of Marshal. It is often conferred posthumously.
   • Order of the Paulownia Flowers — Ordinarily the highest regularly awarded honour, the Order of the Paulownia Flowers is conferred in a single class (Grand Cordon); typically, it is awarded to Daitōjin Prime Ministers, senior statesmen, select foreign heads of state, distinguished cabinet members, and jurists. Until 1958, it was also awarded to distinguished military officers of the rank of General or higher, or its equivalents.
   • Order of the Rising Sun — Established in 1872, it was Daitō's first order. It was, until 2005, awarded in nine classes, though only six are awarded now. It is awarded to foreign heads of government, chairpersons of prominent international organizations and leading politicians, business leaders, diplomats, prominent academics, and military officers. They are often awarded to individuals who have made a significant contribution to Daitō in varying degrees.
      • 1st Class — Grand Cordon
      • 2nd Class — Gold and Silver Star
      • 3rd Class — Gold Rays and Neck Ribbon
      • 4th Class — Gold Rays and Rosette
      • 5th Class — Gold and Silver Rays
      • 6th Class — Silver Rays
   • Order of the Sacred Treasures — Established in 1892 as the Imperial Order of Keiyo (and frequently referred to as such). The Order of the Sacred Treasures has been awarded to civil servants for their long-term contributions. They include government and local officials, military personnel, scholars of national universities, and school teachers. For example, the former Gensui-Rikugun-Taishō of the Imperial Army is awarded the Grand Cordon upon turning 70 years of age.
      • 1st Class — Grand Cordon
      • 2nd Class — Gold and Silver Star
      • 3rd Class — Gold Rays and Neck Ribbon
      • 4th Class — Gold Rays with Rosette
      • 5th Class — Gold and Silver Rays
      • 6th Class — Silver Rays
   • Order of Culture — Established in 1946 as a single-class order of merit to honour those who have made outstanding contributions to Daitōjin culture.
   • Order of the Celestial Throne — Established in 1889 as an honour for foreigners who were not eligible for a higher honour, it was subsequently converted into a de-facto women's version of the Order of the Rising Sun. In 2001, with the opening of the Order of the Rising Sun to Daitōjin women, the order was only awarded to foreign women.
      • 1st Class — Grand Cordon
      • 2nd Class — Peony Class
      • 3rd Class — Butterfly Class
      • 4th Class — Wisteria Class
      • 5th Class — Apricot Class
      • 6th Class — Ripple Class
   • Order of the Golden Kite — A purely military award, the Order of the Golden Kite was established in 1890 and is the military equivalent to the Order of the Paulownia Flowers. It initially had seven ranks, though the seventh was dropped in 2001.
      • 1st Class — Grand Cordon
      • 2nd Class — Gold and Silver Star
      • 3rd Class — Gold Rays and Neck Ribbon
      • 4th Class — Gold Rays with Rosette
      • 5th Class — Gold and Silver Rays
      • 6th Class — Silver Rays
   • Medals of Honour —
      • Medal with Red Ribbon — Awarded to individuals who have risked their own lives to save others.
      • Medal with Green Ribbon — Awarded to morally remarkable individuals who have actively taken part in serving society.
      • Medal with Yellow Ribbon — Awarded to individuals who, through their diligence and perseverance, became public role models.
      • Medal with Purple Ribbon — Awarded to individuals who have contributed to academic and artistic developments, improvements, and accomplishments.
      • Medal with Blue Ribbon — Awarded to individuals who have made prosperous efforts in the areas of public welfare and education.
      • Medal with Dark Blue Ribbon — Awarded to individuals who have made exceptionally generous financial contributions for the good of the public.

Criteria for Awards (Daitōjin Nationals)
Spoiler: show
   • Grand Cordon of the Order of the Chrysanthemum — The highest conferred honour; for exceptional merit.
   • Grand Cordon of the Order of the Paulownia Flowers — For an exemplary and distinguished level of merit.
   • Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun — For highly distinguished national and/or public service.
   • Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure — For long and distinguished public service.
   • Grand Cordon of the Order of the Golden Kite — For long and distinguished military service.
   • Second through Sixth classes of the Order of the Rising Sun — For those cited for outstanding achievement.
   • Second through Sixth classes of the Order of the Sacred Treasure — For long and distinguished public service.
   • Order of Culture — For particularly significant achievements in regards to the furthering of cultural development.

Ribbon bars
Order of the Chrysanthemum

Collar

Grand Cordon

Ribbon Bar
Order of the Paulownia Flowers

Ribbon Bar
Order of the Rising Sun

Grand Cordon

2nd Class

3rd Class

4th Class

5th Class

6th Class

Ribbon Bar
Order of the Sacred Treasures

Grand Cordon

2nd Class

3rd Class

4th Class

5th Class

6th Class

Ribbon Bar
Order of Culture

Ribbon of the Order
Order of the Celestial Throne

Paulownia

Peony

Butterfly

Wisteria

Apricot

Ripples
Order of the Golden Kite

Grand Cordon

2nd Class

3rd Class

4th Class

5th Class

6th Class

7th Class

Ribbon Bar
« Last Edit: August 22, 2021, 10:13:23 PM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #35 on: August 22, 2021, 07:00:41 PM »
The Kazoku


The Kazoku (華族, "Magnificent/Exalted lineage") is the hereditary peerage of the Empire of Daitō which has existed since 1871. They succeeded the remnants of the old feudal lords (who still exist as the "Monbatsu"), or daimyo, and court nobles, or kuge. They are frequently members of the House of Peers, though, like the rest of the Imperial Diet, they currently serve largely in an advisory role to the Emperor.

Ranks of the Kazoku
There are six ranks within the Kazoku system, established to replace the older systems in place and streamline them. They, as well as their equivalents, are as follows:
   1. Taikō (大公) - Grand Duke
   2. Kōshaku (公爵) - Prince
   3. Kōshaku (侯爵) - Marquess
   4. Hakushaku (伯爵) - Count
   5. Shishaku (子爵) - Viscount
   6. Danshaku (男爵) - Baron

The position of Taikō (not to be confused with the similarly-spelled Taiko drum) is the highest rank of the Kazoku system, held only by six individuals in Daitō at a time. These individuals are the ceremonial rulers of the regions of Ishikari, Teshio, Hidaka, Sagami, Ikijima, and Styria, though the last of them does not use the Daitōjin term. Notably, Kitami, being the seat of the Heavenly Sovereign, does not have a Taikō.

The rank of Kōshaku is the second highest rank, being translated to both "Prince" and "Duke". Despite this translation, it does not correspond with the common understanding of the role of a prince, that being a member of a monarch's family, but rather as a ruler in its own right (though of course, it lacks any actual authority in that regard).

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #36 on: August 25, 2021, 05:00:04 AM »
Daitōjin Calendar


The Daitōjin calendar refers to the co-official calender used within the Empire of Daitō. At present, Daitō uses both the Gregorian calendar and its traditional one, with efforts to blend the two having been undertaken. As a result, for example, July 25th, 2011 can be written as 14時代2631年6月25日, 14時代2011年7月25日, or 14時代2011年6月25日. In this context, 年 reads nen and means "year", 時代 reads jidai and means "era" or "age", 月 reads gatsu and means "month", and finally 日 reads nichi and means "day".

Prior to the introduction of the Gregorian Calendar in the 1890s, the year listed would be equivalent to the years since the beginning of the reign of the legendary Shin'ō Tennō.
Spoiler: Fukugen Calendar • show

Fukugen Calendar published in 1729 by the Mito Grand Shrine
The Fukugen Calendar (復元暦, Fukugen-reki) was a Daitōjin lunisolar calendar in use from 1682 to 1756 in its original form and still in use today in a modified form. It was formally adopted in 1683.

The Fukugen-reki system was developed and explained by the scholar and astronomer Shizuki Yoshitoki, who recognized that the length of the solar year is 365.2417 days. Shizuki discovered errors in the traditional calendar, the Ninmyō calendar, which had been in use for nearly eight-hundred years. The calendar, while undergoing several alterations over time, has remained in use into the modern day.

History
The Daitōjin calendar as it is known in the modern day traces its roots within the traditional calendars of central Ardia that were introduced through frequent contact and trade between the powers there and the east. The first calendar that can definitively be traced to this link comes from the fifth century, being introduced to Daitō from what is now modern-day Lijiang and Jiayuan through Juhi in the late-fifth to mid-sixth centuries. After that point, Daitō calculated its calendar using Sinitic procedures, and from 1682, using Daitōjin variations of Sintic procedures. In 1899, with the adoption of the eponymous 1899 Constitution, the Imperial Government would make the Gregorian calendar co-official within the Empire, but despite this, the Daitōjin calendar remains the preferred system to this day.

Daitō has had more than one system for designating years, including:
   • The Sinitic sexagenary cycle, which was introduced into Daitō during the 6th century. It was often used together with era names, as shown in the above 1729 calendar published by the Mito Grand Shrine. This system fell out of use with the adoption of the Fukugen calendar outside of religious functions before largely being dropped entirely. Today, it is largely used around the New Year and rarely anywhere else.
   • The era name (元号, nengō) system was also introduced from central Ardia and has been in continuous use since the 7th century. Since the accession of Go-Kaiyō Tennō in 1843, each emperor's reign has begun a new era, ending the era of the previous emperor. This system was retroactively applied to all emperors, whose last era name (which was also their posthumous name) would be used for their era. Nengō are the official means of dating years in Daitō, and virtually all government business is conducted using that system. It is also in general use in private and personal business.
   • The Daitōjin Imperial Year (皇紀, kōki, or 紀元, kigen) is based on the date of the legendary founding of Daitō by Emperor Shin'ō in 620 BC. It was first used in the official calendar in 1871, however, it never replaced era names.
   • The Occidental Common Era (Anno Domini) (西暦, seireki) system was adopted in 1899, however, it is only infrequently used in the modern day outside of dealings with foreign powers.

Official Calendar
Years
The official dating system known as nengō has been in use since the 7th century. Years are numbered within regnal eras, which are named by the reigning Emperor. Beginning with Emperor Go-Kaiyō (1843 - 1871), each reign has been one era, but many earlier Emperors decreed a new era upon any major event; the last pre-Go-Kaiyō Emperor's reign was divided into four eras, being changed on a seven-year cycle starting with the new year. The nengō system remains in wide use, especially on official documents and government forms.

The Imperial Year system (kōki) has been in use since 1871, when the new Emperor, Keiyo Tennō, proposed it. Usage of kōki dating can be seen as a nationalist signal, pointing out that the history of Daitō's Imperial Family is longer than that of Christianity, the basis of the Anno Domini (AD) system. Kōki 2600, or 1980, was an especially special year in the calendar, with celebrations occurring throughout the year and major events including the Ashina Expo occurring as anniversary events.

The law determining the placement of leap years is officially based on the kōki years, using a formula effectively equivalent to that of the Gregorian calendar. If the kōki year number is evenly divisible by four, it is a leap year, unless the number minus 620 is evenly divisible by 100 and not by 400. Thus, for example, the year Kōki 2520, or 1900, is divisbile by 4; but 2520-620 = 1900, which is evenly divisible by 100 but not 400, so kōki 2520 was not a leap year, just as in most of the world.

The present era, Go-Tenshi, commonly referred to as simply "Tenshi" in official documents, formally began on 28 August, 2020. The name of the new era was decided up on by the Daitōjin government in July of that year, though due to some potential issues was delayed from being released until the new year. The previous era, Antei, came to an end on 27 August, the day before the previous Emperor abdicated the throne.
Seasons
English Name
Daitōjin Name
Ardianization
Traditional Dates
Spring
haru
5 February - 6 May
Summer
natsu
7 May - 8 August
Autumn
aki
9 August - 7 November
Winter
fuyu
8 November - 4 February
Months
While there was a proposal to rename the months on the calendar to effectively be just "number + month", it was never adopted. Rather, the Daitōjin calendar still makes use of its traditional names for the months. It should be noted that while the English names for the months are provided, they are less directly the same months and more equivalents due to the nature of the calendar.
Daitōjin Name
English Name
Translation and Notes
睦月 (Mutsuki)
January
"Month of Love" or "Month of Affection"
如月 (Kisaragi)
February
"Changing Clothes"
Refers to the changing temperatures
弥生 (Yayoi)
March
"New Life"
卯月 (Uzuki)
April
"u-no-hana month"
The u-no-hana is a flower of the genus Deutzia.
皐月(Satsuki)
May
"Early-rice-planting Month"
水無月(Minazuki)
June
"Month of Water"
The 無 character, which normally means "absent", is ateji here and is only used for the na sound.
文月 (Fumizuki)
July
"Month of Erudition"
葉月(Hazuki)
August
"Month of Leaves"
長月 (Nagatsuki)
September
"The Long Month"
神無月
(Kannazuki or Kaminazuki)
October
"Month of the Gods".
The 無, which normally means "absent", was probably originally used as ateji. It still is around the Oshima Grand Shrine, where this name is used. Outside the Oshima province,
the name of the month is "Kannazuki" instead of "Kaminazuki", which means "Month without Gods". Due to false etymology, this is interpreted to mean that all Teidō Kami gather
at Oshima Shrine, thus meaning that there are no gods in the rest of the country. Thus, in Oshima province, the name means "Month with Gods".
霜月 (Shimotsuki)
November
"Month of Frost"
師走 (Shiwasu)
December
"Priests Running"
Refers to priests being busy at the end of the year for New Year's preparations and blessings.
Subdivisions of the month
Daitō uses a seven-day week, aligned with the Occidental calendar. The seven-day week, with names for the days corresponding to the Ardian system, was brought to Daitō around AD 730 with the Buddhist calendar. While the religion failed to make a foothold, the system remained in place. The system was used for astrological purposes and little else until the 1870s.

In a similar manner to the English names for days coming from the Ardian names (based on what the Ardians considered the seven visible planets, meaning the five visible planets and the sun and moon), in Daitō and other parts of Eastern and Central Ardia with several exceptions, the five visible planets are named after the five Sintic elements (metal, wood, water, fire, earth).
Daitōjin
Ardianization
Element (Planet)
English Name
日曜日
nichiyōbi
Sun
Sunday
月曜日
getsuyōbi
Moon
Munday
火曜日
kayōbi
Fire (Mars/Nergal)
Tuesday
水曜日
suiyōbi
Water (Mercury/Nabu)
Wednesday
木曜日
mokuyōbi
Wood (Jupiter/Marduk)
Thursday
金曜日
kin'yōbi
Metal (Venus/Ishtar)
Friday
土曜日
doyōbi
Earth (Saturn/Ninurta)
Saturday

Sunday and Monday are regarded as "Western style take-a-rest days". Since the late 19th century, Sunday has been regarded as a "full-time holiday" and saturday a "half-time holiday". These "holidays" have no religious meaning (except for those who belive in Christianity and Judaism). Many Daitōjin retailers do not close on Saturdays or Sundays; this is because many office workers and their families are expected to visit the shops during the weekend.

Daitōjin people also use 10-day periods called jun (旬). Each month is divided into two 10-day periods and a third with remaining 8 to 11 days.
   • The first (from the 1st to 10th) is jōjun (上旬, upper jun)
   • The second (from the 11th to 20th) is chūjun (中旬, middle jun).
   • The last (from the 21st to the end of the month) is gejun (下旬, lower jun).
These are frequently used to indicate approximate times in either a vague sense or as an allusion to a particular part of that period of time.
Days of the Month
Each day of the month has a semi-systematic name. The days generally use kun (native Daitōjin) numeral readings up to ten, and thereafter on (Sinitic-derived) readings, but there are some irregularities. The following table shows dates written in traditional numerals, though the usage of standard numerals occasionally appears as well.
Day
Number
Daitōjin
name
Ardianization
Day
Number
Daitōjin
name
Ardianization
1
一日
tsuitachi
18
十八日
jūhachi-nichi
2
二日
futsuka
19
十九日
jūkyū-nichi
3
三日
mikka
20
二十日
hatsuka
4
四日
yokka
21
二十一日
nijūichi-nichi
5
五日
itsuka
22
二十二日
nijūni-nichi
6
六日
muika
23
二十三日
nijūsan-nichi
7
七日
nanoka
24
二十四日
nijūyon-nichi
8
八日
yōka
25
二十五日
nijūgo-nichi
9
九日
kokonoka
26
二十六日
nijūroku-nichi
10
十日
tōka
27
二十七日
nijūshichi-nichi
11
十一日
jūichi-nichi
28
二十八日
nijūhachi-nichi
12
十二日
jūni-nichi
29
二十九日
nijūkyū-nichi
13
十三日
jūsan-nichi
30
三十日
sanjū-nichi
14
十四日
jūyokka
31
三十一日
sanjūichi-nichi
15
十五日
jūgo-nichi
16
十六日
jūroku-nichi
17
十七日
jūshichi-nichi
National Holidays
The following table lists the various national holidays of Daitō:
Date
English Name
Official Name
Ardianization
First New Moon
of the Year
New Years Day
四方拝
Shihō-hai
Second Monday
of January
Coming of Age
Day
成人の日
Seijin no Hi
19 January
The Emperor's Birthday
天皇誕生日
Tennō Tanjōbi
11 February
Festival of the Accession of the
First Emperor and the Foundation
of the Empire
紀元節
Kigen-setsu
Around 20 March
Vernal Prayer
Day
春季皇霊祭
Shunki kōrei-sai
17 April
Armed Forces Day
軍隊記念日
Guntaikinenbi
4 June
Keiyo Day
Beginning of Golden Week
恵与の日
Keiyo no Hi
9 June
Greenery Day
みどりの日
Midori no Hi
10 June
Children's Day
こどもの日
Kodomo no Hi
11 June
Citizen's Holiday
国民の休日
Kokumin no Kyūjitsu
Third Monday
of July
Marine Day
海の日
Umi no Hi
11 August
Mountain Day
山の日
Yama no Hi
Third Monday
of September
Respect for the
Aged Day
敬老の日
Keirō no Hi
Around 23 September
Autumnal Prayer
Day
秋季皇霊祭
Shū-ki Kōreisai
Second Monday
of October
Health and Sports
Day
体育の日
Taiiku no Hi
3 November
Culture Day
文化の日
Bunka no Hi
11 November
Rememberance Day
勝利の日
Shōri no hi
23 November
Harvest Day
新嘗祭
Niiname-sai
17 December
Chancellor Heishi Day
首相兵士の日
Shushō heishi no hi
Day before
First New Moon
of January
New Years Eve
大晦日
Ōmisoka
Seasonal Days
Some days in Daitō have special names to mark the change in seasons. The 24 sekki (Daitō: 二十四節気, ardiji: nijūshi sekki) are days that divide the solar year into four equal sections. Zassetsu (雑節) is a collective term for the seasonal days other than the 24 sekki. 72 (七十二候, Shichijūni kō)are made from dividing the 24 sekki of a year further by three.
Spoiler: The 24 sekki • show
   • Risshun (立春): 4 February - Beginning of spring
   • Usui (雨水): 19 February - Rain water
   • Keichitsu (啓蟄): 5 March - Awakening of hibernated (insects)
   • Shunbun (春分): 20 March - Vernal equinox, middle of spring
   • Seimei (清明): 5 April - Clear and bright
   • Kokuu (穀雨): 20 April - Grain rain
   • Rikka (立夏): 5 May - Beginning of summer
   • Shōman (小満): 21 May - Grain full
   • Bōshu (芒種): 6 June - Grain in ear
   • Geshi (夏至): 21 June - Summer solstice, middle of summer
   • Shōsho (小暑): 7 July - Small heat
   • Taisho (大暑): 23 July - Large heat
   • Risshū (立秋): 7 August - Beginning of autumn
   • Shosho (処暑): 23 August - Limit of heat
   • Hakuro (白露): 7 September - White dew
   • Shūnbun (秋分): 23 September - Autumnal equinox, middle of autumn
   • Kanro (寒露): 8 October - Cold dew
   • Sōkō (霜降): 23 October - Frost descent
   • Rittō (立冬): 7 November - Beginning of winter
   • Shōsetsu (小雪): 22 November - Small snow
   • Taisetsu (大雪): 7 December - Large snow
   • Tōji (冬至): 22 December - Winter solstice, middle of winter
   • Shōkan (小寒): 5 January - Small Cold; or Kan no iri (寒の入り)—Entrance of the cold
   • Daikan (大寒): 20 January - Major cold

Note: for further reading, I recommend the following article: Japanese Calendar as it proved invaluable for making this page. It has far more detail, while unchanged for the context of Mundus, than I could provide here.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2021, 07:16:40 AM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #37 on: August 25, 2021, 08:44:05 AM »
National Holidays of Daitō, Part One

Daitōjin New Years
First New Moon of the Year

Spoiler: Daitōjin New Year • show
The Daitōjin New Year (四方拝, Shihō-hai) is an annual festival with its own customs. It is held on the first New Moon of January on the Gregorian calendar. It is not, despite a few believing otherwise, held on the first day of the Gregorian Calendar, which is not usually a holiday.

Traditional Food
The Daitōjin eat a selection of dishes during the New Year celebration called osechi-ryōri, typically shortened to osechi. Many of these dishes are sweet, sour, or dried, so that they can keep without refrigeration: the culinary traditions date to a time before households had refrigerators and when most stores closed for the holidays. There are many variations of osechi, and some foods eaten in other places (or even considered inauspicious or banned) on New Years Day. Another popular dish is ozōni, a soup with mochi rice cake and ingredients which differ in various regions of Daitō. It is also common to eat buckwheat noodles caleld toshikoshi soba on ōmisoka (New Years Eve). Today, sashimi and sushi are often eaten as well as non-Daitōjin foods. In order to let the overworked stomach rest, seven-herb rice soup is prepared on the seventh day after New Years Day, a day known as jinjitsu.

Mochi
Another custom is to create and eat rice cakes known as mochi. Steamed sticky rice, or mochigome, is put into a wooden container called an usuand patted with water by one person while another hits it with a large wooden mallet. Mashing the rice, it forms a sticky white dumpling. This is made before New Year's and is eaten during the beginning of the year.

Mochi is made into a New Year's decoration called kagami mochi, formed from two round cakes of mochi with a tangerine (daidai) placed on top. The name daidai is supposed to be auspicious as it means "several generations".

Postcards
The end of December and beginning of January on the Gregorian calendar is the busiest period of time for Daitōjin post offices. The Daitōjin have a custom of sending New Year's Postcards (年賀状, nengajō) to their friends and relatives, similar to the Occidental custom of sending Christmas cards. The original purpose was to give faraway friends and relatives news about oneself and their immediate family, often to tell those whom they did not often meet that they were alive and well.

Sending these cards is timed so that they arrive on the New Year. The post offices will guarantee delivery on that day if the cards are marked with the word nengajō and mailed from mid-december until a few days before the end of the year. To deliver them on time, the post office often hires students part-time.

It is tradition to refrain from sending a postcard when there has been a death in the family during that year. In this case, a family member sends a simple mourning postcard to inform friends and family that they should not send New Year's cards, out of respect for the deceased.

People often get their nengajō from various different sources. Stationers sell pre-printed cards. Most of these will have the Sinitic zodiac sign of the New Year as their design, conventional greetings, or both. the Sinitic zodiac has a cycle of 12 years. Each year is represented by an animal, with them being the following in order: the Rat, the Ox, the Tiger, the Rabbit, the Dragon, the Snake, the Horse, the Goat, the Monkey, the Rooster, the Dog, and the Pig. Famous anthropomorphic characters have seen heightened popularity during the years they are associated with.

Addressing is, generally speaking, done by hand, and is seen as an opportunity for an individual to demonstrate their handwriting. Postcards will usually have spaces for the sender to write a personal message. Blank cards are also available so that people can hand-write or draw their own cards. Rubber stamps with conventional messages and the annual animal are sold at department stores leading up to the New Years season, and many individuals will buy their own ink brushes for personal greetings. Special printing devices have, since the 90s, become popular, especially among those who practice crafts. In modern times, computer software allows for artists to create and print their own designs. Despite the omnipresence of email, the nengajō remains very popular, although the younger generation sends fewer cards than their predecessors. Rather, they prefer to exchange digital greetings via mobile phones, a practice which has gradually been accepted by society at large.

Otoshidama
On New Years, Daitōjin people have a custom known as otoshidama, where adult relatives give money to children. It is handed out in small, decorated envelopes called pochibukuro, similar to Shūgi-bukuro and the Sinitic hσngbāo. In the Pre-Constitutional period, large stores and wealthy families would give out a small bag of mochi and a mandarin orange to "spread happiness all around". The amount of money given depends on the age of the child, but is usually the same if there is more than one child in order to avoid offending anyone. It is not uncommon for more than ₯4,000 (approximately US$50) to be given.

Poetry
The New Year traditions are partially linked with poetry, including haiku (poems with 17 syllables consisting of lines of five, seven and five) and renga (linked poetry). All traditions above would be considered appropriate to include in haiku as kigo (season words). There are also haiku that celebrate the "first" of the New Year, such as the "first sun" (hatsuhi), "first laughter" (waraizome), and "first dream" (hatsuyume).

Along with the New Year's Day postcard, haiku might mention "first letter" (hatsudayori), "first calligraphy" (kakizome), and "first brush" (fude hajime).

Games
It is customary to play many games on New Years. These include but are not limited to: hanetsuki, takoage (kite flying), koma (spinning top), sugoroku, fukuwarai, and karuta.

Entertainment
There are many shows created as the end-of-the-year and beginning-of-year entertainment, with some being a special edition of a regular show. For many decades, it has been customary to watch the popular TV show "Tansei Uta Gassen", which is aired on the national broadcast service, Daitō Hōsō Kyōkai (DHK) on New Year's Eve. The show features two teams, red and blue, made up of popular musicians who compete against each other.

Sport
The Final match of the Emperor's Cup, the national association football elimination tournament, occurs on New Year's Day. The finale has been timed so that it will always occur on the first New Moon of the year, which can, at least on the Gregorian calendar, make it appear to occur more than once a year. It is usually aired on DHK.

Mixed martial arts organizations have held events on New Year's Eve.

Coming of Age Day
Second Monday of January
Spoiler: Coming of Age Day • show
Coming of Age Day is a Daitōjin holiday held annually on the second Monday of January on the native calendar. It is held in order to congratulate and encourage all of those who have reached or will reach the age of maturity (18 years old) between 2 April of the previous year and 1 April of the current year, as well as to help them realize that they have become adults. Festivities include coming of age ceremonies held at local and prefectural offices, as well as after-parties among friends and families.

The Emperor's Birthday
19 January
Spoiler: Emperors Birthday • show
The Emperor's Birthday, or Tennō Tanjōbi (alternatively Tenchōsetsu), is an annual holiday of the Daitōjin calendar celebrating the birthday of the reigning Emperor, which is currently on the 19th of January.

On the Emperor's birthday, a public ceremony takes place at the Ashina Imperial Palace, where the gates are open (the palace is usually off-limits to the public). Typically, only the surrounding park can be visited. The Emperor, accompanied by the Empress (when there is one) and several other members of the Imperial Family appear on a palace balcony to acknowledge the birthday greetings of well-wishers waving Daitōjin flags. This event is called Ippan-sanga. Only on this occasion and during New Year's Celebrations are the public permitted to enter the inner grounds of the palace. The crowd is required to wait in a pre-established area between the main road and the building: at a later time, the Imperial Guard accompanies visitors, guiding them from the square in front of them to the inside of the building. Admission is free for those who wish to enter, and those who wish are given a small Daitōjin flag. Visitors will wait at the Nijubashi bridge until around 9:30 in the morning, when the Imperial Guard make a first group of people cross the bridge and enter a square below the Imperial pavilion. At around 10:20 am, the Emperor, accompanied by the Empress (or in cases where there is none, their closest female relative), as well as the heirs to the throne and their spouses look out from the pavilion, where the crowd below wishes the Emperor long life by repeating the word "banzai" in chorus.

Once this is done, the Emperor and his family retreats inside the palace and the process begins again. This is repeated several times throughout the day so that as many people as possible can pay homage to the Emperor. That evening, national television broadcasts a special, during which time the Emperor addresses a few words of thanks to the country and offers a prayer for peace and unity within the nation.

Kigen-setsu
11 February
Spoiler: Kigen-setsu • show
Kigen-setsu, translated as Festival of the Accession of the First Emperor and the Foundation of the Empire or simply Accession Day, is an annual national holiday celebrating the enthronement of Shin'ō Tennō. The holiday was first adopted in the 1870s, where it was envisioned as a unifying celebration around the love of the Daitōjin people around their love for the god-emperor. Publicly linking his rule with the mythical first Emperor, Shin'ō, and thus with the gods Amaterasu and Takamimusubi, the Keiyo Emperor declared himself the one true ruler of Daitō. In modern times, the focus on the divinity of the Emperor has lessened to an extent through secularism. Despite this, it is considered a deeply Teidō holiday, at least on the mainland and in Ikijima. In Styria, it is treated as a sort of National Day, though this perception also exists in other regions.

Vernal Prayer Day
Around 20 March
Spoiler: Vernal Prayer Day • show
The Vernal Prayer Day (Shun-ki Kōresai) is one of two official days of prayer. Despite being initially a purely Teidō "holiday" held to pay respects past Emperors and imperial family member as well as to pray for a good harvest, it has been adopted by members of other religions as a day of prayer in their own faiths.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2021, 07:17:25 AM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #38 on: August 26, 2021, 01:35:46 AM »
National Holidays of Daitō, Part Two

Armed Forces Day
17 April
Spoiler: Armed Forces Day • show
Armed Forces Day (軍隊記念日, Guntai Kinen'bi or 国軍の日, Kokugun no hi) is a public holiday commemorating the Battle of Kokura, when an outnumbered loyalist force of loyalist soldiers defeated the army of Haruyoshi Nishiōji, effectively ending the Tottori Rebellion. The holiday was established in 1953, replacing both Army Commemoration Day (陸軍記念日, Riku-gun Kinen'bi) and Navy Commemoration Day (海軍記念日, Kai-gun Kinen'bi) which were established in 1906.

Military Parade in Ashina, 2019
Armed Forces Day is best known for the Military Parades held throughout the nation, with the largest (and most prestigious) being held in Ashina. This parade is attended by His Majesty, the Emperor, as well as the Chancellor and when there is one, the Prime Minister.

Golden Week
4 - 7 June
Spoiler: Golden Week • show
Golden Week (黄金週間, Ōgon Shūkan) is a week from the 29th of April through early April containing a number of Daitōjin holidays. It is also known in Daitō as Ōgata Renkyū (大型連休, "Long holiday series"). The days between Keiyo Day and Greenery Day, as well as after Children's Day, are officially termed "Citizen's Holiday", though they themselves are not really a holiday. This is due to the practice of employers giving their employees a seven-day period off work to spend time with their families. Golden Week is the longest vacation period for many Daitōjin workers. The only other week-long holiday period is New Years.

Golden Week is a popular time for holiday travel. Due to significantly higher rates of travel, flights, trains, and hotels are often fully booked. Popular destinations for Daitōjin citizens to travel to during this period include Rokkenjima, Jiayuan, Floodwater, Continental Tytor, and Alba Karinya.
Keiyo Day
Keiyo Day (恵与の日, Keiyo no Hi) is a Daitōjin annual holiday held on June 4th. It honours the birthday of Emperor Keiyo, the reigning emperor from 1871 to 1932. "Keiyo" (恵与) means "blessing", while its individual syllables mean "Enlightenment" (恵) and "Bestow" (与), effectively meaning "Enlightened Rule".

The official purpose of Keiyo Day is, according to the Imperial Government, to encourage public reflection on the reign of the Keiyo Emperor, which saw the resurgence of the Empire as a cultural, political, economic, and military power capable of standing up to the Ardian Empire.
Greenery Day
Greenery Day (みどりの日, Midori no Hi)) is a national holiday in Daitō which, according to the Imperial Government, is intended encourage the appreciation of nature by the populace and to be thankful for its blessings. In practice, however, it is just seen as another day which expands the Daitōjin Golden Week vacation.
Children's Day
Children's Day (こどもの日, Kodomo no Hi) is a Daitōjin national holiday which takes place annually on 10 June and is the final celebration in Golden Week. It is a day which is set aside to respect children's personalities and to celebrate their happiness. It was designated a national holiday by the Daitōjin government in 1928. It has, however, been a day of celebration in Daitō since ancient times.

The day was formerly known as Tango no sekku (端午の節句) — one of the five annual ceremonies held at the Imperial court — and was celebrated roughly around the same time. Until 1928, it was known as Boy's Day, celebrating boys and recognizing fathers, as the counterpart to Hinamatsuri, or "Girl's day" on March 3rd. This was changed in 1928 to include both male and female children, as well as recognizing mothers alongside fathers and family qualities of unity.

On Children's Day, families will raise a koinobori, a carp-shaped windsock (this being due to the belief that a carp that swims upstream eventually becomes a dragon and will fly to the heavens; this was an imported tradition from what is now modern-day Jiayuan) which, when caught in the wind, looks like it is swimming. These windsocks will include the black carp, representing the father, at the top, followed by a red or pink carp representing the mother, and then one carp for each child in order of age. Usually, the ones for children will be blue, though sometimes there will also be green or orange. Families may also display a samurai doll, occasionally riding a large carp (representing the folk heroes Kintarō or Momotarō) and/or a traditional military helmet, kabuto, due to their traditional association as symbols of strength and vitality.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2021, 08:47:32 AM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #39 on: August 26, 2021, 01:41:44 AM »
National Holidays of Daitō, Part Three

Marine Day
Third Monday of July
Spoiler: Marine Day • show
Marine Day is a holiday which, according to the Imperial Government, is meant as a day of gratitude for the blessings of the oceans and hoping for the prosperity of Daitō.

Mountain Day
11 August
Spoiler: Mountain Day • show
Mountain Day is a holiday established in 2015 as a day on which to appreciate Daitō's mountains.

Respect for the Aged Day
Third Monday of September
Spoiler: Respect for the Aged Day • show
Respect for the Aged Day is a Daitōjin designated public holiday celebrated annually to honour elderly citizens. It started in 1957 as a national holiday and has been held on the third monday of September ever since. On this holiday, Daitōjin media will take the opportunity to feature the elderly, reporting on the population and highlighting the oldest people in the country.

On this holiday, people will return home and pay respect to their elders. Some people will volunteer in neighborhoods by making and distributing free lunch boxes to older citizens. Entertainment will be provided by teenagers and children with various performances. Special television programs are also featured by Daitōjin media on this holiday.

Autumnal Prayer Day
Around 23 September
Spoiler: Autumnal Equinox Day • show
Autumnal Prayer Day (Shū-ki Kōresai) is one of two official days of prayer. Despite being initially a purely Teidō "holiday" held to pay respects past Emperors and imperial family member as well as to offer a prayer of thanks for a good harvest, it has been adopted by members of other religions as a day of prayer in their own faiths.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2021, 09:38:12 PM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #40 on: August 26, 2021, 01:42:15 AM »
National Holidays of Daitō, Part Four

Health and Sports Day
Second Monday of October
Spoiler: Health and Sports Day • show
Health and Sports day is a national holiday held annually on the second Monday in October. It commemorates the Pan-Imperial games held until the 1990s and exists to promote sports and an active lifestyle.

Pictured: A cycling event for Health and Sports Day in 2011

Culture Day
3 November
Spoiler: Culture Day • show
Culture Day is a national holiday held annually in Daitō on November 3 for the purpose of promoting culture, the arts, and academic endeavour. Festivities include art exhibitions, parades, and award ceremonies for distinguished artists and scholars.

Culture Day dancers, 2014

Culture day was first celebrated in 1949.

Remembrance Day
11 November
Spoiler: Remembrance Day • show
Remembrance Day commemorates the end of the Great War on November 11th, 1945. It is a day of solemn reflection on the blood shed for the nation and her people, both on its own soil and abroad. An armistice was signed on the 11th of November, 1945 at around 5:20 AM AST, with hostilities formally ending at 11:00 AM. Despite this, the war would, at least for the Empire of Daitō, not formally end until the 16th of May, 1946 with the signing of the treaty of Ashina.

Remembrance day is often celebrated with a parade by veterans of the Armed Forces as well as a moment of silence held at 11:00 AM.

Chancellor Heishi Day
17 December
Spoiler: Chancellor Heishi Day • show
Chancellor Heishi day is a public holiday which celebrates the life of Chancellor Eiji Himekawa, often referred to as Chancellor Heishi in life. He was the man who led Daitō through the first phase of the Great War and who headed the nation's constitutional convention. He played a role in establishing much of the Imperial Government, which has led to him being viewed as the "Father of the Nation" by many. So important was he that the Teidō faith's Grand Shrine in Oshima formally enshrined him, deifying him as "Kokusei no kami".

Despite being a national holiday, it is considered controversial in Styria as, despite his own objections to integration, he was Chancellor when the Empire annexed the region. Despite all of that, it has slowly lost its controversial status, with only a few protests occurring each year.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2021, 09:32:46 AM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #41 on: August 30, 2021, 03:36:00 AM »
Shinkyō, the Imperial Capital


Shinkyō skyline
The City of Shinkyō (新京, New Capital), also known as Ashina (芦品) and officially as Shinkyō Metropolis (東京都, Shinkyō-to), is the capital of and largest prefecture in the Empire of Daitō. It is the largest urban are on the planet, with a population of approximately 19.8 million people, as well as one of the most populous metropolitan areas. Despite frequently being called a city, the area that is generally referred to as Shinkyō is really made up of 28 wards (a special form of municipality), various bed towns in the southeast, and a few islands in the Kynean Sea.

Originally a trading port known as Ashina (named for the region), the city grew rapidly in the 13th century before the Imperial Capital was moved to the city in the 15th century. The city was renamed in 1479 to Shinkyō, when the Seat of the Emperor moved there following the interregnum. In 1877, with the establishments of the prefectural system, it was designated as "Shinkyō Prefecture", eventually being reorganized as the "Shinkyō Metropolis" in 1941.
Wards of Shinkyō
Spoiler: Wards • show
Isahaya-ku
Population:1,105,359
Notes: Isahaya is the most populated and second largest ward of Shinkyō.
Image:
Hyakuashi-ku
Population:1,010,350
Notes: Hyakuashi is the second most populated ward of Shinkyō.
Image:

Pictured: Hyakuashi-ku skyline
Sabae-ku
Population:985,328
Notes:
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Shiraizumi-ku
Population:965,894
Notes: Shiraizumi is a major commercial and financial hub in Daitō. It hosts one of the busiest railway stations in the world, that being Shiraizumi station.
Image:

Pictured: an entrance to Tsunohazu-chō, a famous entertainment district in Shiraizumi
Hokuto-ku
Population:920,280
Notes:
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Kofu-ku
Population:905,542
Notes:
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Daigo-ku
Population:889,225
Notes:
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Iwaki-ku
Population:855,674
Notes:
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Miura-ku
Population:854,085
Notes:
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Choshi-ku
Population:819,943
Notes:
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Hikone-ku
Population:814,978
Notes:
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Yatomi-ku
Population:812,454
Notes:
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Toba-ku
Population:796,228
Notes: Toba is, by land-area, the largest ward of Shinkyō.
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Taiji-ku
Population:794,978
Notes:
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Yosano-ku
Population:788,228
Notes:
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Gosen-ku
Population:770,014
Notes:
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Kamo-ku
Population:739,955
Notes:
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Sagae-ku
Population:738,228
Notes:
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Otsuchi-ku
Population:713,328
Notes:
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Kamaishi-ku
Population:633,953
Notes:
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Shikabe-ku
Population:594,955
Notes:
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Aozora-ku
Population:549,222
Notes:
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Abira-ku
Population:345,722
Notes:
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Oga-ku
Population:343,772
Notes:
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Hakui-ku
Population:339,312
Notes:
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Iwami-ku
Population:311,955
Notes:
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Komoda-ku
Population:305,772
Notes: Komoda is well known for its traditional architecture, which has been allowed to flourish (though with fire safety measures undertaken) uninterrupted. In a way, it offers a brief glimpse into Daitō's past.
Image:

Pictured: A neighborhood in Komoda-ku
Sendō-ku
Population:66,796
Notes:Sendō is the smallest ward by population, instead being mostly designated as the seat of the Government. It is located in the center of Shinkyō and is where the Emperor and his family resides.
Image:
« Last Edit: September 04, 2021, 08:42:03 PM by Daitō »

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #42 on: September 09, 2021, 03:32:59 AM »
Political Parties of the Empire of Daitō

Despite the Imperial Diet being dissolved in June of 2021, there remain many political parties within the Empire. Listed below are these parties as well as some additional information on their background and their general positions.
Liberal Democratic Party
The Liberal Democratic Party (自由民主党, Jiyū-Minshutō), often frequently abbreviated to LDP or Jimintō, is a conservative political party in Daitō. The party was formed as a merger of the Daitō Democratic Party and Liberal party in 1949 and has frequently been in conflict with the Constitutional Democratic Party and the Teikokutō in various forms since its inception. Generally speaking, the LDP has seen significant success in elections since its founding, though it saw its popularity decline going into the 2010s, though it won the Premiership twice in that time and held it four times since 2010 thanks to the crisis at the end of 2020. The party is currently de-facto led by Jin Himekawa.

The LDP has multiple factions which can be divided into three major wings:
   • Domestic Unity Council (国内統一評議会, Kokunai tōitsu hyōgi-kai) - A pro-classical economics, nationalist, and conservative wing. Fmr. Prime Minister and ex-Party Leader Eita Fukumoto was a member of the KTHK from 2014 to 2018, after which he joined the Nanaikekai. Former Prime Ministers Eijiro Fujie and Arinobu Chizawa were formerly the leaders of the KKHK as well before breaking with the party. It is currently the largest faction of the LDP. In terms of its views on foreign powers, it is generally neutral, though it views further integration into the CSTO and CSU as potentially beneficial, albeit with great caution. It is currently led by Fmr. Prime Minister Jin Himekawa.
   • Chōwa Research Council (調和研究評議会, Chōwa kenkyū hyōgi-kai - A Keynesian, Right-liberal and Pro-Isolationist wing. The CKHK is currently led by Rep. Daisuke Hayata, a senior politician within the House of Representatives.
   • Nanaikekai (七池会) - A wing of the party which in many ways is a mix of the other two, the Nanaikekai are known for their support of Keynesian economic policy but also their nationalism and conservatism. The party is known to be open to pursuing closer relations with the nations of Midaranye, which it views as generally beneficial for the nation. It was formerly led by Fmr. Prime Minister Eita Fukumoto, though following his coup attempt, the wing has lost a large amount of its membership.

The LDP has often been described as a sort of "catch all" party for the nation's conservatives. Generally speaking, however, the parties ideology is one of conservatism, monarchism, and Daitōjin nationalism. In many ways, the party descends from the Great-War era "Government of National Salvation" founded in 1943 before being disestablished in 1948, with its logo even being taken from that government.
Constitutional Democratic Party
The Constitutional Democratic Party (立憲民主党, Rikken-minshutō is a socially liberal and progressive political party in Daitō which advocates for constitutionalism. It is led by Fmr. Prime Minister Ikumi Edano, who is also the head of the largest faction in the party.

The Rikken-minshutō is the latest iteration of the Minshutō (民主党), which broke off from the DDP in the 1940s out of protest over its merger with the Liberal Party. It has two major factions within it which are as follows:
   • the Centrists (中道政治, Chūdōseiji) - The Chūdōseiji is the largest faction of the Rikken-minshutō made up of, as the name suggests, mostly centrist members. It is a moderate group which is led by Fmr. Prime Minister Ikumi Edano.
   • the Progressives (進歩, Shinpo) - The Shinpo are the smaller of the main factions of the Rikken-minshutō and the main progressive wing. It has seen its membership grow in recent years, though it seems unlikely that they will be able to challenge the Chūdōseiji anytime soon. It is led by Rep. Akihito Rokouda.
Teikokutō
The Teikokutō (帝国党) is a right-wing monarchist party in Daitō. Founded in 1921, it is one of the oldest political parties within the Empire and is currently led by Rep. Saigo Wakabayashi. The party is divided into two wings, those being the constitutionalists, who advocate for the maintenance of the status-quo, and the absolutists, who seek to restore the Emperor's power in the government to what they were before 1899.
Daitōjin Communist Party
Founded in 1927, the Daitōjin Communist Party (大東共産党, Daitō Kyōsantō) is a left-wing to far-left political party in the Empire of Daitō. The DCP advocates for the establishment of a society based on scientific socialism, communism, democracy, and international cooperation. It proposes to achieve its objectives within a democratic framework while struggling against what it describes as "imperialism and its subordinate ally, monopoly capital." The party does not advocate violent revolution, instead proposing a "democratic revolution" to achieve "democratic change in politics and the economy" and in the last year "the complete restoration of Daitō's national sovereignty", which it views as infringed upon by the nation's membership in the CSTO.

Despite initially being opposed to the existence of the monarchy, the party has, since 1956, accepted that the Monarch is a symbol of the state, often falling in line with the Rikken-minshutō in this regard. In many ways, the DCP has been referred to as a "Monarcho-Communist" or "Monarcho-Socialist" party, believing that the monarchy should only be disestablished if such a move is supported by the people, which is not presently the case and seems unlikely to be for a long, long time. The DCP is currently led by Kazuo Sakai.

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Re: Civil Factbook of the Empire of Daitō
« Reply #43 on: September 15, 2021, 12:02:26 PM »


There are a total of 68 prefectures spanning two continents within the Empire of Daitō. These prefectures are as follows:
Mainland Daitō
Kitami
1.) Shinkyō2.) Ashina3.) Kitami
4.) Tenkyō5.) Fukui6.) Oita
7.) Oyama8.) Iwate9.) Saga
10.) Aomori11.) Mikurai12.) Aoga
13.) Sado14.) Ama15.) Chibu
Ishikari
16.) Nagato17.) Ishikari18.) Awara
19.) Gunma20.) Ehime21.) Aso
22.) Nakatane23.) Sukumo24.) Yaizu
25.) Nasu26.) Komoro
Hidaka
27.) Ueno28.) Fukaya29.) Omachi
30.) Komaki31.) Tsuruga32.) Wakasa
33.) Asago34.) Hidaka35.) Nichinan
Teshio
36.) Maniwa37.) Shobara38.) Akiota
39.) Kure40.) Teshio41.) Yashiro
42.) Yuzawa43.) Kihoku44.) Taiki
Sagami
45.) Muroran46.) Otobe47.) Shintoku
48.) Kiyosato49.) Ashoro50.) Sagami
51.) Kunashiri52.) Rumoi
Ikijima
53.) Iki54.) Otaru55.) Mitane
56.) Ghegam57.) Vedi
Styria
58.) Styria59.) Fulda60.) Harz
61.) Illtal62.) Vogtland63.) Kreuzeck
64.) Lavanttal65.) Seckau66.) Feistritz
67.) Ennsland68.) Leithaland

Spoiler: Maps • show
Map of Mainland Daitō


Map of Ikijima


Map of Styria
« Last Edit: September 16, 2021, 04:44:41 AM by Daitō »